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It is truly incredible how something so basic like a piece of colored thread can be turned into a glorious masterpiece. Artist Gabriel Dawe does just that. Originally from Mexico-city, the Dallas-based artist has been continually creating these jaw-dropping installations that pop up places around the work like Belgium, Canada, Barcelona and the UK.

Gabriel Dawe creates site-specific installations that explore the connection between fashion and architecture, and how they relate to the human need for shelter in all its shapes and forms. “His work is centered in the exploration of textiles, aiming to examine the complicated construction of gender and identity in his native Mexico and attempting to subvert the notions of masculinity and machismo prevalent in the present day.”

All we can say is WOW.

 

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via This Is Colossal:

Photographer Daniel Kukla who has a background in both biology and anthropology has a new series of work called The Edge Effect where he photographed square mirrors propped on easels in locations around Joshua Tree National Park to catch the reflection of the horizon behind him.

The resulting images create the bizarre effect of looking at a paintings sitting in the middle of the desert. Of the work Kukla says:

In March of 2012, I was awarded an artist’s residency by the United States National Park Service in southern California’s Joshua Tree National Park. While staying in the Park, I spent much of my time visiting the borderlands of the park and the areas where the low Sonoran desert meets the high Mojave desert. While hiking and driving, I caught glimpses of the border space created by the meeting of distinct ecosystems in juxtaposition, referred to as the Edge Effect in the ecological sciences. To document this unique confluence of terrains, I hiked out a large mirror and painter’s easel into the wilderness and captured opposing elements within the environment. Using a single visual plane, this series of images unifies the play of temporal phenomena, contrasts of color and texture, and natural interactions of the environment itself.

Check out some of the photos below, and you can see his website for several more photos.

 

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The DENY Designs featured artist of the week is Leah Flores. Leah is new to the DENY Designs team this past month and her unique photography/typography-esque style is one that we have fallen in love with – we are sure you will too!

About Leah Flores:

Leah Flores is a Portland-based artist who brings together her love of photography and illustration to create adventuresome designs. Born in the Pacific Northwest on Leap Year Day 1988, Leah is a first-generation American with Costa Rican and Scottish roots. In her work you will find mountains, forests, and wildflowers woven with hand-lettered evocations to go explore the natural world.

Don’t you love these?!

To see all of Leah Flores designs on DENY products, visit her page here: http://denydesigns.com/collections/leah-flores-all-art

I need a vacation! The talented photographer Gray Malin is the creative genius behind this series of breath-taking aerial photos of beaches around the world.

Bondi Beach – Sydney, Australia

In his incredible ongoing series titled À la Plage, À la Piscine, Gray shoots from doorless helicopters, capturing life on the beaches below. His project has taken him around the world and the results are simply stunning. From such heights, people and objects become patterns creating repetition, shape and form. These photographs are a visual celebration of color, light, shape—and summer bliss, leaving us daydreaming of a beach, a towel and some sun.

Bondi Beach – Sydney, Australia

Brazil

Coogee Beach – Sydney, Australia

East Hampton, New York

Lisbon, Portugal

Lisbon, Portugal

Malibu, California

Marouba Bay – Sydney, Australia

Miami, Florida

Miami, Florida

Montauk Beach – East Hampton, New York

Nude Beach

Ocean Beach

Ocean Beach

Rio De Janeiro, Brazil

Sagaponack Beach – Bridgehampton, New York

Santa Monica, California

St. Tropez, France

St. Tropez, France

Tiki Umbrellas

Be sure to check out: http://www.maisongray.com/collections for the complete gallery of this wonderful series.

Happy Daydreaming!

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The DENY Designs featured artist of the week is Happee Monkee. New to the DENY Designs team last month, Happee Monkee’s photography designs are already a hit among DENY fans. Her use of scrabble pieces in her work create a way to bring a bright and happy message into your home that we love!

About Happee Monkee:

“As a young child, I was a little trigger monster. I played with my dad’s old film camera and loved how it magically immortalizes time. After years of snappy happy shots, I’ve learned to compose my photographs and play with light to produce desirable results. Many of Happee Monkee’s photos are from my travels around extraordinary places in the world. I am so fortunate to have been to Japan, Paris, Sweden, Moscow, London, Venice and many other amazing countries. I’ve previously worked in a publishing house, as a stylist and travel writer.”

To see all of Happee Monkee’s designs on DENY products, visit her artist profile page here: http://denydesigns.com/collections/happee-monkee-all-art

National Geographic is known for their stunning photo journalistic and landscape photographs, so it is no surprise that the winners of the National Geographic Traveler Magazine 24th Annual photo contest have some absolutely incredible talent.

National Geographic Traveler Magazine received more than 12,000 entries from 6,615 talented photographers in 152 countries around the globe. Using the power of photography, contestants shared their lives through their work. Taken in locations ranging from Afghanistan to Vietnam, the winning pictures show everything from peaceful landscapes to unexpected moments. However, all of them depict the beauty of the places and people that make traveling memorable.

Here are the 12 winning photographs – each with an amazing story behind them.

FIRST PLACE WINNER: BUTTERFLY
Photo and caption by Cedric Houin
This image was shot in the Kyrgyz lands of the Wakhan Corridor. The intimacy of this everyday life moment, shot inside of a family yurt, is in total contrast with the harsh environment these nomadic tribes live in. On the right we notice a television and a sound console. These tribes live weeks away from any village by foot. In spite of being located at an altitude of 4,300 meters in one of the most remote areas of Afghanistan they are equipped with solar panels, satellite dishes and cellphones. Ancestral ways of living, with touches of modernity.

SECOND PLACE WINNER: MY BALLOON
Photo and caption by Vo Anh Kiet
H’mong children play with their balloons on a foggy day in Moc Chau, Son La province, Vietnam; photographed January 2012.

THIRD PLACE WINNER: DEVOTEES
Photo and caption by Andrea Guarneri
During the Easter holy celebration called “Misteri” in Trapani, the devotees carry the scenes of Christ’s passion on their shoulders all night long. When the day comes they take a break.

MERIT WINNER: LOOKING INTO ANOTHER WORLD
Photo and caption by Fred An
This is the great Japanese maple tree in the Portland Japanese Gardens. I tried to bring a different perspective of this frequently photographed tree.

MERIT WINNER: LOST IN TIME – AN ANCIENT FOREST
Photo and caption by Ken Thorne
Near the city of Morondava, on the West coast of Madagascar lies an ancient forest of Baobab trees. Unique to Madagascar, the endemic species is sacred to the Malagasy people, and rightly so. Walking amongst these giants is like nothing else on this planet. Some of the trees here are over a thousand years old. It is a spiritual place, almost magical.

MERIT WINNER: UNDERWATER SURF
Photo and caption by Lucia Griggi
Taken at Cloud Break at an outer reef in Fiji, a surfer duck dives his board to clear the rolling waves of the raw ocean.

MERIT WINNER: BAGAN BLISS
Photo and caption by Peter DeMarco
More than 2,000 Buddhist temples and pagodas fill the plains of Bagan. Once the capital of the Pagan Empire, farmers now raise their livestock within the centuries old complex. The best way to see Bagan, apart from a ride on a hot air balloon, is by bicycle. It’s easy to get off the beaten path and live out your wildest Indiana Jones fantasy.

MERIT WINNER: OLD MEN WITH DJELLABA
Photo and caption by SauKhiang Chau
The Last Supper Of Da Vinci? No, They are just some old men of Chefchaouen with djellaba, sitting and talking each other.

MERIT WINNER: THE VILLAGE OF GASADALUR
Photo and caption by Ken Bower
The village of Gásadalur and the island of Mykines in the background.
Until a tunnel was built in 2004, the 16 residents living in Gásadalur had to take a strenuous hike or horseback over the steep 400 meter mountain in order to make it to the other villages.
It was a rare sunny day in the Faroe Islands and I had to wait until the clouds rolled in to provide some softer light. I decided to go with a long exposure (1 minute 10 seconds) to illustrate the force of the wind and a serene sea among the isolated islands.

MERIT WINNER: SWIMMING IN THE RAIN
Photo and caption by Camila Massu
My sister in the south of Chile. We are sitting at home next to the fireplace in our southern lake house when it suddenly began to pour uncontrollably. Had to rush into the lake to take this snapshot!

VIEWERS’ CHOICE WINNER: HUSET
Photo and caption by Michelle Schantz
A lonely cabin is illuminated under the Northern Lights in Finnmark, Norway.

You can see the full stories behind each photo here: http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/traveler-magazine/photo-contest/2012/.

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Combining his love for food and typography, Phiadelphia-based artist and creative director Roni Lagin has created a brilliant series of typographic posters that foodies around the world are sure to love. The poster series celebrate the renowned foods and cuisine types from each of the different cities from around the world.

His series, titled ‘Delicious City Prints‘ has covered some of the most popular foodie capitals around the world – such as New York, Paris, New Orleans, London and Chicago, creating a visual, fun way to check out cuisine from around the world!

Check out some of Lagin’s posters below: 

 

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Floor is an art piece that features 180,000 plastic figures crowded together with arms turned skyward, holding up glass plates that are able to support the weight of visitors. It was created by South Korean artist Do Ho Suh and can be seen at the Singapore Tyler Print Institute.

Would you trust the little guys to hold up their end of the deal?

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Colorful origami is popping up in unexpected urban places in Hong Kong and Vietnam this summer compliments of French paper artist Mademoiselle Maurice.  Not just for fun, Mademoiselle Maurice places the installations to convey a deeper message.

She says about her work, “The origami crane became an international symbol of peace. It’s also a tribute for all the victims of the violent actions in our world. We can see an human solidarity network thought of the accumulation of all the papers. Sometimes, I like to imagine when I am folding that all the origamis are like people, and I imagine some imaginary positive connection  between this humans. Therefore, every origami represents in a simplify way some natural elements, in a graphic way, like flowers or birds.”

Hundreds of paper cranes in all different bright colors arranged into urban (and unexpected) masterpieces. So gorgeous!

 

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Get ready to saw “awwww”!

British photographer Mark Taylor has an uncanny knack for bringing out the cuddly sides of his subjects’. Mark Taylor creatively pairs pets and animals like kittens and ducklings and then captures their interactions – some of which are too darn cute for words.

His photographs are a legacy from his late mother Jane Burton who pioneered the style so familiar on calendars in offices and maths teacher classrooms everywhere. His work has even graced the cover of National Geographic Magazine.

So far, he has had no cases of them eating each other.

 

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The DENY Designs featured artist of the week is Shannon Clark. Shannon recently joined the DENY Designs family, but her work is already a big hit. Her photography and designs add such a bright, fresh look to DENY products – we are loving it!

About Shannon Clark:

SSC Photography by Shannon Clark was born in early 2011 when I decided to dabble in to an interest that I have always admired through others pieces – photography. Already having a life long love of art and color, I decided to mix the 3 together and create the kind of art I love – happy, fun, bright and unexpected. I love color and the effect it has on one’s mood. I like taking ordinary, everyday things and sights and adding a fun, colorful twist on them with a variety of vintage to modern finishes and effects. There is beauty in everything all around, and it can be brought out in fun and unexpected ways! I truly love what I do and hope it shows in my work!

Shannon Clark Summer Bloom Throw Pillow

Shannon Clark Summer Bloom Throw Pillow

To see all of Shannon’s work on DENY Designs products, visit: http://denydesigns.com/collections/shannon-clark-all-art

One man’s trash is another man’s treasure (or amazing art installation).

An art installation recently popped up on Botafogo Beach in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil that showcases three gigantic fish made from discarded plastic bottles. The title of the installation is “recycle your attitude”.

The sculptures were created to raise awareness for the recently completed United Nations Conference on Sustainable Development, dubbed Rio+20 - a conference held to discuss and promote environmental protection.

Pretty great right?

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Stefano Unterthiner is the successful photographer behind these amazing shots of wildlife- up close and very personal. He is known for his ability to get face to face with the animals – and coming out with some incredible photos.

He specializes in telling the life stories of animals, living in close contact with his chosen species for long periods of time. He also has a strong commitment to wildlife conservation and environmental issues, with a particular interest in the interactions between people and animals.

Love these!

 

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UK street artist Mobstr creates interesting and funny street art by using sarcastic sentences that cheekily challenges the way we view public spaces – and we kind of love it.

He is known for ‘conversing’ with the law’ through his graffiti after having his works painted over multiple times. But he continues to strike again and again, creating what he sees as ‘true’ works of art. But it is up to you to decide.

Art or not?

 

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In honor of the Sydney International Food Festival held each year in Sydney’s Hyde Park, advertising agency WHYBIN/TBWA got together and created something amazing to showcase the chefs from all around the world participating in the event. Using only the ingredients from the food types and cultures that each country is known for, they artfully created flags to represent them – and wow, are they incredible!

Does this make you hungry too?

Italy

Brazil

Australia

China

France

Greece

India

Indonesia

Japan

Lebanon

South Korea

Spain

Switzerland

Thailand

Turkey

United Kingdom

United States

Vietnam

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Talk about getting jazzed up on caffeine - at the Aroma Festival at The Rocks in Sydney, Australia (an annual coffee festival), organizers used 3,604 cups of coffee — four shades using different amounts of coffee and milk — to make an incredibly accurate replica of Leonardo da Vinci’s Mona Lisa.

It measures an impressive 20 feet high and 13 feet wide and took a team of eight people three hours to complete. It was created for The Rocks Aroma Festival in Sydney, Australia, and seen by 130,000 people who attended the one-day coffee-lovers event.

At least those long hours put in by the artists of this piece were probably much more enjoyable with endless cups of java!

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So, can you guess exactly what this giant monkey sculpture is made of from the first few photos before getting to then end? We had no idea either, but were blown away by the talent of the art students who constructed this in Sao Paulo, Brazil.

Ready, set, guess!

And the survey says: FLIP FLOPS!

Designed for the Pixelshow 2010 this sweet sculpture was pictured lying innocently in a local park ready to amuse and entertain passersby on their daily strolls. Dutch artist Florentjin Hofman designed the structure, and the students involved in the project constructed it and appropriately named it “Fat Monkey,” just in time for Pixelshow’s 2010 conference, which showcases art with a pixelated look. Students built the monkey’s body out nearly 10,000 of flip flops because the sandals are a long-standing trademark of Brazil.

Pretty awesome! Thank you Rosie Brown for sharing this story with DENY Designs!

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These days, it seems like PANTONE is everywhere. So what better way to commemorate the Queen’s Diamond Jubilee celebration than with a super cool color guide made from selections matching the Queen’s wardrobe over the years?

PANTONE and advertising agency Leo Burnett London chart six decades of style for Queen Elizabeth II with the launch of a limited-edition ‘Diamond Jubilee Color Guide’. The guide is designed to capture and commemorate some of the Queen’s most memorable color choices since her coronation – featuring PANTONE Color references and citing the date and location that determined her outfit color choice.

Selecting feature colors from the Queen’s wardrobe, PANTONE featured some of these colors – the reason behind them? Check it:

PANTONE 13-0755 Primrose Yellow - The Queen’s royal wedding outfit from 2011 was Primrose Yellow. Yellow is a color that speaks to the future with hope and optimism.

PANTONE 13-4411 Crystal Blue - Blue is a colur staple in the Queen’s wardrobe, is also seen as de-stressing so it’s no surprise she was sporting a serene blue to a Royal Garden Party in 2010.

PANTONE 16-2124 Pink Carnation - In recent years, she has been seen in trendier bright pinks, defying her age and communicating that she is a monarch modern in thought and spirit.

PANTONE 13-5414 Ice Green - During the Queen’s landmark state visit to Ireland, the first since the country gained independence in the 1920s, she was seen in a cool shade of green.

So will you be seen using the Diamond Jubilee Color Guide? Or will you steer clear of this PANTONE look book?

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Bird Ave Los Angeles Purple Fleece Throw Blanket

The DENY Designs Featured Artist of The Week:  BirdAve.  BirdAve is new to DENY Designs this month and specializes in city skyline art that we have already fallen deeply in love with. Anything from big cities to universities to football stadiums, BirdAve creates designs that showcase your favorite landmarks in a most unique way- not to mention they look fabulous on DENY Designs products. 

Take a look at some of amazing designs from BirdAve on DENY Designs products:
http://denydesigns.com/collections/bird-ave-all-art

Pretty fun right? What do you think?

Thanks to The Denver Post, we came across this incredible story of Paul Marti, matchstick mastermind:

Kathryn Scott Osler, The Denver Post

The first thing Paul Marti wants you to understand about his odd and wondrous matchstick creations — his delicate cathedrals, soaring castles, luxe mansions — is that they are art, not craft.

He didn’t hone his solitary skill by replicating actual buildings the way other matchstickers do. Those copycats. He designed them in his head, dreamed up their rounded towers and elaborate arches, painted their stained glass, placed their columns and capitals and tiny crosses just so. He solved their construction problems the way an artist would, by conjuring a vision of something beautiful first, then doing whatever it took to make it real.

He’s not a snob about it — in fact, he’s out of work right now. A commission would be swell, he reminds you — but these objects are his life’s work, and he wants you togetthat they are originals. “I would like to see them in a museum,” he says, “That’s where they belong.”

He has contacted several, he says, but it has been a tough sell. He’s not famous, he doesn’t have an agent. And how to even describe his work? Each is a combination of things. Architecture, sculpture, carpentry, masonry. They are fantastical, but real. They are engineered to stand strong, but they have the quaint charm of dollhouses, too.

This is the how he makes them: He bundles together six matchsticks to form a log, then with a scroll saw, he slices the logs into sections about an eighth of an inch thick to make bricks, then he lays the bricks into a wall, using single matchsticks as mortar. The walls come together into buildings, and details — cornices, steeples, domes, parquet floors, flying buttresses — are connected to complete the vision.

And this is how long it takes: 10,000 hours for his giant Swiss cathedral, about 3 feet long and 2 feet high. Maybe seven years of his life on one project. He has been making matchstick buildings since he was about 7 years old, and has completed maybe a dozen, cutting, gluing, rounding corners with a belt sander, whenever he was not working. “This was my life,” he said. “This was all I did.”

What drives him to this kind of perfection? He answers that awkwardly, as if he doesn’t know himself, as if he’s not even sure that all this work was worth it. But he believes he can do something no one can. People make matchstick buildings, but they don’t have his technique, his construction details. “I can create something exactly the way it was built 1,000 years ago. I can say I can do that.”

Kathryn Scott Osler, The Denver Post

Kathryn Scott Osler, The Denver Post

Kathryn Scott Osler, The Denver Post

Kathryn Scott Osler, The Denver Post

Kathryn Scott Osler, The Denver Post

As the part of its “Tribute to Fashion” charity project, Coca Cola asked some of the best Italian designers to put their stamp on its limited edition bottle, including Moschino, Donatella Versace, Angela Missoni, Alberto Ferreti, Consuelo Castiglioni and Etro, who showcased their creations at the Milano Fashion Centre.

The bottles, dressed in their high-end Italian designer couture even strutted their stuff down the runway to launch the campaign.

“Italian designers revamp Coca Cola Light bottle! It’s thirsty work visiting fashion show after fashion show, but we doubt anyone could drink through a Coca Cola bottle this big, as seen at Milan Fashion Week.” — [Metro.co.uk]

These Coca Cola Light designs initially went on sale September 25, 2011 in Italy, and all profits from sales will help young women from the Abruzzo area find scholarships.

Versace

Moschino

Moschino

Alberta Ferretti

Etro

Blumarine

        

We love these! Almost too good-looking to even think about drinking though!

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The DENY Designs featured artist of the week is the Anderson Design Group. The Anderson Design Group is new to the DENY Designs family just this past month. We are absolutely loving their colorful retro designs – sure to transform any space into a fun one.

More about Anderson Design Group:

Anderson Design Group, Inc. founder Joel Anderson graduated from Ringling School of Art & Design in 1986. He was recruited straight from college to work as a staff illustrator and designer at Carden & Cherry Advertising in Nashville, TN. While at C&C, Joel won an Emmy Award for his work on a CBS show, Hey Vern, It’s Ernest. Joel worked at C&C for 7 years, learning the art & science of advertising (and how to talk like Ernest.) In 1993, Joel and his friend David Thomas founded Anderson Thomas Design, Inc. The firm focused on CD package design at first, and quickly grew into a diverse print & web design company with a client list that included Universal Studios, DreamWorks Pictures, Golden Books, Thomas Nelson and more.

In 2007, the partners decided to pursue different interests, so Joel reorganized the design firm as Anderson Design Group, Inc., narrowing the studio’s focus to specialize in illustrative design, branding, and product development.

Check out some of their designs on DENY products:

To see all of Anderson Design Group’s work on DENY Designs products, just head over here: http://denydesigns.com/collections/anderson-design-group-all-art

So, what do you think? Pretty fun right?

This is surely one project that I don’t know I could finish entirely without eating it first. But one group of very dedicated artists from London-based bakery Crumbs and Dollies created the most incredible looking Cherry Blossom mosaic made using only cupcakes. And not just “some” cupcakes – the bakery group got together for Japanese TV show ITTEQ with Laura Hadland and the Morisanchu Group and baked and iced 10,000 whole cupcakes for the mosaic. The installation took place last and was put on display at the Highcross Shopping Centre at Leicester.

How the installation was not eaten upon hours of debut is beyond me, but it looks amazing. My compliments to chefs!

 

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Artist Florentijn Hofman has once again left us in awe with his “Big Yellow Rabbit” art installation that he created last summer in Orebro, Sweden – Floretijn Hofman was the same mastermind behind the big yellow Rubber Duckie that floated its way down the river in France.

The Big Yellow Rabbit was a temporary 13 meter high sculpture.  The rabbit was created as an enlarged cuddle toy made out of swedish products thrown against the statue of Engelbrekt.

Hofman’s work often deals with simplistic happiness – his signature oversized installations serve as diversions that ease the tension of modern life.  His work often gives onlookers a moment of serenity amidst times of economic and political turmoil. We can’t help but appreciate this.

 

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You cannot help but to smile when seeing these images – and that is just the reaction that artist Florentijn Hofman wanted.  Sometimes it is the simple things in life that mean the most, and to tap into those feelings, Hofman created his giant yellow duckie with the mission of simply bringing people together through the presence of art.

Treating the Loire as a giant bubble bath, as The Rubber Duck cruises, it brings a message of joy, without political or sociological connotation. Hofman’s work often deals with simplistic happiness – his signature oversized installations serve as diversions that ease the tension of modern life.  His work often gives onlookers a moment of serenity amidst times of economic and political turmoil. We can’t help but appreciate this.

“The duck itself is a durable vessel, made from an inflatable plastic shell, a pontoon boat, and a generator to help propel it forward downstream. It gently moves throughout the environment without disrupting the nature of the marine life in the river below. Rising 82 feet by 82 feet wide, the bath time toy conjures up childhood memories and nostalgic narratives, undeniably creating smiles as it passes through each town.”

The Rubber Duck traveled a 40 mile stretch from Saint-Nazaire to Nantes, France as part of the Loire Estuary art exhibition. The Rubber Duck has already delighted the shores of both Osaka and Sao Paulo, and it will likely continue its journey to other waterways around the world, surely spreading joy and smiles everywhere it floats.

We hope this ducky makes it’s way across the pond to visit us sometime soon – what an incredible sight!

Absolutely brilliant.

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