DENY Designs Artist of The Week: Leah Flores

The DENY Designs featured artist of the week is Leah Flores. Leah is new to the DENY Designs team this past month and her unique photography/typography-esque style is one that we have fallen in love with – we are sure you will too!

About Leah Flores:

Leah Flores is a Portland-based artist who brings together her love of photography and illustration to create adventuresome designs. Born in the Pacific Northwest on Leap Year Day 1988, Leah is a first-generation American with Costa Rican and Scottish roots. In her work you will find mountains, forests, and wildflowers woven with hand-lettered evocations to go explore the natural world.

Don’t you love these?!

To see all of Leah Flores designs on DENY products, visit her page here: http://denydesigns.com/collections/leah-flores-all-art

Surf’s Up: Amazing Wave Photography

Surf’s up! At least for Hawaiian-based photographer Kenji Croman it is. Kenji Croman is the mastermind behind these amazing photos of waves seen in ways that most of us can only dream of.

Not only a master of his trade – his work has been featured on CNN Travel and the cover’s of various surfing magazine – but also extremely passionate about showing the world his point of view in the water through his work.

He says “The reason why I enjoy photographing the artistic wave from my point of view is because it’s so hard to describe what i see when I’m in the water. For years before I got into wave photos, I would be bodysurfing these beautiful perfect waves in the morning, the colors would be amazing and I wanted to share it with others. No one in their right mind would wake up at 4:30am to watch the sunrise, and even if they did, they wouldn’t be in the water experiencing what I am. So with my background in photography, and many, many years of practicing, I learned the art of wave photography.”

Do these make you want to go to the beach too?

 

images via

Winning: National Geographic Photo Contest Winners Announced

National Geographic is known for their stunning photo journalistic and landscape photographs, so it is no surprise that the winners of the National Geographic Traveler Magazine 24th Annual photo contest have some absolutely incredible talent.

National Geographic Traveler Magazine received more than 12,000 entries from 6,615 talented photographers in 152 countries around the globe. Using the power of photography, contestants shared their lives through their work. Taken in locations ranging from Afghanistan to Vietnam, the winning pictures show everything from peaceful landscapes to unexpected moments. However, all of them depict the beauty of the places and people that make traveling memorable.

Here are the 12 winning photographs – each with an amazing story behind them.

FIRST PLACE WINNER: BUTTERFLY
Photo and caption by Cedric Houin
This image was shot in the Kyrgyz lands of the Wakhan Corridor. The intimacy of this everyday life moment, shot inside of a family yurt, is in total contrast with the harsh environment these nomadic tribes live in. On the right we notice a television and a sound console. These tribes live weeks away from any village by foot. In spite of being located at an altitude of 4,300 meters in one of the most remote areas of Afghanistan they are equipped with solar panels, satellite dishes and cellphones. Ancestral ways of living, with touches of modernity.

SECOND PLACE WINNER: MY BALLOON
Photo and caption by Vo Anh Kiet
H’mong children play with their balloons on a foggy day in Moc Chau, Son La province, Vietnam; photographed January 2012.

THIRD PLACE WINNER: DEVOTEES
Photo and caption by Andrea Guarneri
During the Easter holy celebration called “Misteri” in Trapani, the devotees carry the scenes of Christ’s passion on their shoulders all night long. When the day comes they take a break.

MERIT WINNER: LOOKING INTO ANOTHER WORLD
Photo and caption by Fred An
This is the great Japanese maple tree in the Portland Japanese Gardens. I tried to bring a different perspective of this frequently photographed tree.

MERIT WINNER: LOST IN TIME – AN ANCIENT FOREST
Photo and caption by Ken Thorne
Near the city of Morondava, on the West coast of Madagascar lies an ancient forest of Baobab trees. Unique to Madagascar, the endemic species is sacred to the Malagasy people, and rightly so. Walking amongst these giants is like nothing else on this planet. Some of the trees here are over a thousand years old. It is a spiritual place, almost magical.

MERIT WINNER: UNDERWATER SURF
Photo and caption by Lucia Griggi
Taken at Cloud Break at an outer reef in Fiji, a surfer duck dives his board to clear the rolling waves of the raw ocean.

MERIT WINNER: BAGAN BLISS
Photo and caption by Peter DeMarco
More than 2,000 Buddhist temples and pagodas fill the plains of Bagan. Once the capital of the Pagan Empire, farmers now raise their livestock within the centuries old complex. The best way to see Bagan, apart from a ride on a hot air balloon, is by bicycle. It’s easy to get off the beaten path and live out your wildest Indiana Jones fantasy.

MERIT WINNER: OLD MEN WITH DJELLABA
Photo and caption by SauKhiang Chau
The Last Supper Of Da Vinci? No, They are just some old men of Chefchaouen with djellaba, sitting and talking each other.

MERIT WINNER: THE VILLAGE OF GASADALUR
Photo and caption by Ken Bower
The village of Gásadalur and the island of Mykines in the background.
Until a tunnel was built in 2004, the 16 residents living in Gásadalur had to take a strenuous hike or horseback over the steep 400 meter mountain in order to make it to the other villages.
It was a rare sunny day in the Faroe Islands and I had to wait until the clouds rolled in to provide some softer light. I decided to go with a long exposure (1 minute 10 seconds) to illustrate the force of the wind and a serene sea among the isolated islands.

MERIT WINNER: SWIMMING IN THE RAIN
Photo and caption by Camila Massu
My sister in the south of Chile. We are sitting at home next to the fireplace in our southern lake house when it suddenly began to pour uncontrollably. Had to rush into the lake to take this snapshot!

VIEWERS’ CHOICE WINNER: HUSET
Photo and caption by Michelle Schantz
A lonely cabin is illuminated under the Northern Lights in Finnmark, Norway.

You can see the full stories behind each photo here: http://travel.nationalgeographic.com/travel/traveler-magazine/photo-contest/2012/.

images via

Too Cute: Photographer Captures Unusual Animal Pairings

Get ready to saw “awwww”!

British photographer Mark Taylor has an uncanny knack for bringing out the cuddly sides of his subjects’. Mark Taylor creatively pairs pets and animals like kittens and ducklings and then captures their interactions – some of which are too darn cute for words.

His photographs are a legacy from his late mother Jane Burton who pioneered the style so familiar on calendars in offices and maths teacher classrooms everywhere. His work has even graced the cover of National Geographic Magazine.

So far, he has had no cases of them eating each other.

 

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Drop It: Incredible Water Drop Refraction Photos

You have to check out the work of Markus Reugels, an incredibly talented German photographer that specializes in high-speed and macro photography. Much of his photography centers around water drops and the brilliant splashes, reflections and shapes they create.

In his series entitled Refractions, Markus takes high-speed photographs of water droplets as they fall in front of a background image. With amazing timing and persistence, Markus is able to capture the ‘refraction’ of the image inside the droplet of water.

The results speak for themselves.

 

images via

DENY Designs Artist of The Week: Shannon Clark

The DENY Designs featured artist of the week is Shannon Clark. Shannon recently joined the DENY Designs family, but her work is already a big hit. Her photography and designs add such a bright, fresh look to DENY products – we are loving it!

About Shannon Clark:

SSC Photography by Shannon Clark was born in early 2011 when I decided to dabble in to an interest that I have always admired through others pieces – photography. Already having a life long love of art and color, I decided to mix the 3 together and create the kind of art I love – happy, fun, bright and unexpected. I love color and the effect it has on one’s mood. I like taking ordinary, everyday things and sights and adding a fun, colorful twist on them with a variety of vintage to modern finishes and effects. There is beauty in everything all around, and it can be brought out in fun and unexpected ways! I truly love what I do and hope it shows in my work!

Shannon Clark Summer Bloom Throw Pillow

Shannon Clark Summer Bloom Throw Pillow

To see all of Shannon’s work on DENY Designs products, visit: http://denydesigns.com/collections/shannon-clark-all-art

In Your Face: Animals Up Close. Really Close.

Stefano Unterthiner is the successful photographer behind these amazing shots of wildlife- up close and very personal. He is known for his ability to get face to face with the animals – and coming out with some incredible photos.

He specializes in telling the life stories of animals, living in close contact with his chosen species for long periods of time. He also has a strong commitment to wildlife conservation and environmental issues, with a particular interest in the interactions between people and animals.

Love these!

 

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That’s One Big Bunny

Artist Florentijn Hofman has once again left us in awe with his “Big Yellow Rabbit” art installation that he created last summer in Orebro, Sweden – Floretijn Hofman was the same mastermind behind the big yellow Rubber Duckie that floated its way down the river in France.

The Big Yellow Rabbit was a temporary 13 meter high sculpture.  The rabbit was created as an enlarged cuddle toy made out of swedish products thrown against the statue of Engelbrekt.

Hofman’s work often deals with simplistic happiness – his signature oversized installations serve as diversions that ease the tension of modern life.  His work often gives onlookers a moment of serenity amidst times of economic and political turmoil. We can’t help but appreciate this.

 

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Oversized Rubber Ducky Bringing Oversized Smiles to Onlookers

You cannot help but to smile when seeing these images – and that is just the reaction that artist Florentijn Hofman wanted.  Sometimes it is the simple things in life that mean the most, and to tap into those feelings, Hofman created his giant yellow duckie with the mission of simply bringing people together through the presence of art.

Treating the Loire as a giant bubble bath, as The Rubber Duck cruises, it brings a message of joy, without political or sociological connotation. Hofman’s work often deals with simplistic happiness – his signature oversized installations serve as diversions that ease the tension of modern life.  His work often gives onlookers a moment of serenity amidst times of economic and political turmoil. We can’t help but appreciate this.

“The duck itself is a durable vessel, made from an inflatable plastic shell, a pontoon boat, and a generator to help propel it forward downstream. It gently moves throughout the environment without disrupting the nature of the marine life in the river below. Rising 82 feet by 82 feet wide, the bath time toy conjures up childhood memories and nostalgic narratives, undeniably creating smiles as it passes through each town.”

The Rubber Duck traveled a 40 mile stretch from Saint-Nazaire to Nantes, France as part of the Loire Estuary art exhibition. The Rubber Duck has already delighted the shores of both Osaka and Sao Paulo, and it will likely continue its journey to other waterways around the world, surely spreading joy and smiles everywhere it floats.

We hope this ducky makes it’s way across the pond to visit us sometime soon – what an incredible sight!

Absolutely brilliant.

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DENY Designs Artist of The Week: Ginette Callaway

The DENY Designs featured artist of the week is Ginette Callaway of Ginette Fine Art.  Ginette’s watercolor and oil pastel pieces are bright and beautiful, and with the wide range of subjects, you are sure to find at least one to fall in love with.

About Ginette Callaway: 

I am French born to a German Mother and a French Father and became a US citizen in 2008. I live in the United States and paint in Oil and Watercolors from my Basement Studio in Georgia. Besides my traditional paintings I also love to do fresh contemporary abstract in watercolor and ink, mostly very colorful. My inspirations life, life and life.

I paint every day because that is what I love to do. If I never leave my basement that is fine because in my head I’m somewhere else. Nature inspires me most, because nature is the biggest wonder of all. Animals, Flowers, scenes from around the world and places I have visited. I remember a fragrance of a flower or fresh squeezed limes and it triggers a painting.

Simply from sun up till sun down my head is in a creative vice.

 

To see all of the Ginette Fine Art pieces on DENY Designs products, visit: http://denydesigns.com/collections/ginette-fine-art-all-art#

Thanks for reading, and please visit us on Facebook, Twitter and Pintrest too!

      

No Umbrella Necessary For This Rain Storm: Amazing Art Installation

Even wondered what rain would look like if it were frozen in time? Well thanks to artist Stacee Kalmanovsky, you can. To replicate the natural phenomenon, she created this installation of beads attached to a fishing line, hung underneath a glass ceiling. It’s as if she froze time, along with the rain drops in mid-air – creating the most amazing rain storm that you’ve ever seen – no umbrella necessary.

Despite the complexity of experience the materials are simple: fishing lines, plastic beads and a good deal of time to create the masterpiece. According to her website: “Stacee’s work is rooted in the uncanny, suggestive, and picturesque. Her urge to invent and exaggerate is tempered by a deep dedication to the medium at hand.”

Born in Gomel, Belarus in 1981, Stacee then moved to Chicago where she attended the University of Illinois. She currently lives and works out of Florence, Italy.

Simply amazing.

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Ewe Have Got To Be Kidding Me

Parents should prepare for some tricky questions from their confused children if they head to a a New Zealand nature park and find this flock of pink wooly mammals grazing on the hills. The extraordinary sight is causing a sensation at SheepWorld, near Auckland. We found this on DailyMail today and were extremely intrigued at the sight of hot pink sheep.

Park bosses originally dyed the animals as part of breast cancer awareness week, but it proved to be such a hit with visitors that they decided to keep them as a permanent feature.


John Collyer, from SheepWorld, said the food colouring they use is completely harmless to the animals and had even been approved by a local vet. He added: ‘We use food colouring, which eventually washes out in the rain.

“Sheep are practically colour blind and so would probably not notice if they or other sheep were pink. The dye is harmless so there are no side effects. We have cleared what we do with our local vet.”

‘Feedback from visitors is 99 per cent positive. One per cent are concerned about the sheep – normally these people don’t understand the precautions we’ve taken.’

SheepWorld is dubbed an insight into sheep farming in New Zealand. Visitors can watch sheep-dog shows and also watch as the flocks are shorn of their woolly fleeces.

images via SheepWorld

Drawings That Span Across Acres, Drawn Using Snowshoes

You know the old saying about how to behave when visiting parks and natural environments? “Take only pictures, leave only footprints.” As it turns out, you can do a lot within those constraints. And if this does not make you want to snowshoe this weekend, we don’t know what will! Found on Co.Design today, artist Sonja Hinrichsen‘s Snow Drawings series. These beautiful landscape interventions are created by the artist and sometimes a team of volunteers who strap on snowshoes and walk in careful continuous spiralling lines across pristine snow.

“Most of my artwork addresses the environment in some way,” says Hinrichsen. What’s interesting here is how that approach plays out in the creation process. By working in the environment, Hinrichsen subjects herself to the environment. Using a substance as ephemeral as snow poses several challenges. For one thing, the work is very temporary–winds and snowfall can erase it within hours or days. “This requires instant photo documentation,” says Hinrichsen. For another, there is the problem of getting pristine snow to work with in the first place.

Originally, this project was going to occur on land owned by the Nature Conservancy. “Unfortunately this winter has been exceptionally dry and there was not anywhere enough snow to create snow drawings on the Nature Conservancy land,” says Hinrichsen. They had to move the project to the one place there was snow, Rabbit Ears Pass.

The actual stamping was done by Hinrichsen alongside a team volunteers, recruited from the community. A fair bit of improvisation on the part of participants was involved. Hinrichsen set the basic parameters: spirals that are created from the inside out and lead from one to the next. “I wanted to assure that the resulting work would become one cohesive piece rather than a collection of small individual drawing attempts.”

Hinrichsen says that the hardest part of creation was the logistics of the project. She came to rely on representatives from Steamboat Springs Arts Council, the Nature Conservancy of Hayden, and the Steamboat Springs public library to coordinate finding a new location, and the movements of the volunteers.

Hinrichsen largely works with large scale video installations, using the medium to explore the places and how humans have used and thought about those places throughout history. Interventions like the Snow Drawings are something she’s begun to explore only in the past few years, but she says she enjoys creating these ephemeral works.

“I’m generally not interested in creating lasting art pieces, as I believe that our world is over-saturated with man-made products,” she says, “I like to unfold my work into large experiences, however I prefer work that lives on in its documentation only, and–hopefully–in the memories of my audiences.”


Check out the video of the art in progress, pretty freakin’ amazing: http://vimeo.com/35890182

All images via http://www.s-hinrichsen.net/